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The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • Protests and demonstrations have led to violence in at least 30 cities across the United States in the aftermath of the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died while in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Floyd, 46, died after he was detained for questioning regarding a possible forgery in progress. Video of his death caught by bystanders showed a Minneapolis police officer, identified as Derek Chauvin, holding his knee to Floyd’s neck for more than five minutes as Floyd pleaded for air, sparking outrage.  As of Tuesday morning, at least 40 cities across 16 states have imposed curfews.  Live updates for Tuesday, June 2 continue below:  NY state senator pepper sprayed, handcuffed at peaceful Monday protest, he says Update 6:06 a.m. EDT June 2: New York State Sen. Zellnor Myrie told CNN he had been protesting peacefully when police handcuffed and pepper sprayed him late Monday. “I am from Brooklyn. I happen to represent a huge swath of central Brooklyn, and when I heard there was a group of folks protesting police brutality I decided to make my way down,” Myrie told the network. Willing to offer his services as liaison between protesters and police, Myrie said he identified himself to authorities upon arriving, but none of that mattered once things escalated. “As I was obeying orders, they were telling us to back up, I was backing up. Trying to protect some of the protesters behind me. Being compliant. I started getting hit in my back by bicycles wielded by the police officers. I was pushed. I was shoved. Ultimately pepper-sprayed, and subsequently handcuffed. Simply because I was there to forcefully protest,” he told CNN, adding, “Had I not had the luxury of my title, I would have been in the system and processed, much like any of the other protesters.' Hit-and-run driver strikes NYPD sergeant Update 5:30 a.m. EDT June 2: A sergeant with the New York Police Department is in serious but stable condition Tuesday morning after being struck by a black sedan that sped away, CNN reported. NYPD Detective Adam Navarro told the network the sergeant was responding to a break-in at a Bronx pawn shop when the vehicular assault occurred. NYPD Lt. Thomas Antonetti told CNN the sergeant has suffered leg and head injuries. Indianapolis protesters, police hug, march together; BLM calls foul Update 5:03 a.m. EDT June 2: Hundreds of demonstrators squared off briefly with police in Indianapolis near the Indiana governor’s mansion after Monday night before finding common ground and marching forward together, The Washington Post reported. Although officers with the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department did, at one point, fire a pepper-spray projectile toward the protesters in an attempt to disperse the crowd for violating the city’s 8 p.m. curfew, the standoff deescalated when protesters began introducing themselves to the officers, the Post reported. Within a short period, the crowd and officers began walking toward downtown, with some law enforcement personnel hugging and linking arms with demonstrators. Meanwhile, Black Lives Matter Indianapolis took exception to the display, offering its own analysis of the exchange via Twitter. Boxing great Floyd Mayweather to pay for George Floyd’s funeral Update 4:42 a.m. EDT June 2: Funeral arrangements for George Floyd in Houston will be handled by boxing champion Floyd Mayweather, ESPN reported. Family attorney Ben Crump confirmed to CNN that Floyd’s funeral is scheduled for June 9. Mayweather’s involvement was confirmed by Leonard Ellerbe, CEO of Mayweather Productions. “He’ll probably get mad at me for saying that, but yes, (Mayweather) is definitely paying for the funeral,” Ellerbe told ESPN in an emailed response. Las Vegas officer shot, 2nd involved in separate shooting as unrest envelops city Update 4:29 a.m. EDT June 2: The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department has confirmed one officer has been shot in the area of the Strip and another has been involved in a shooting in the downtown area, The Associated Press reported. The department said both shootings occurred on Las Vegas Boulevard. The condition of neither officer has been reported. 4 St. Louis police officers shot Update 3:18 a.m. EDT June 2: St. Louis police confirmed four of their own were shot early Tuesday morning after peaceful protests ended and social unrest escalated. According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, most of the peaceable protesters dispersed on their own, but police did fire tear gas into the remaining crowd just before 9 p.m. Within one hour, looting and pillaging began with at least one 7-Eleven set ablaze and raided, while heavy gunfire rang through downtown after midnight, the newspaper reported. St. Louis Police Chief John Hayden, during an early-morning news conference, said two officers were shot in the leg, one was shot in the arm and one was shot in the foot. Minnesota officials: No evidence tanker driver plowed into protesters intentionally Update 2:26 a.m. EDT June 2: Bogdan Vechirko was arrested Monday and charged with assault for driving his tanker truck toward protesters in Minneapolis Sunday. By early Tuesday morning, however, Minnesota investigators walked back the initial belief that Vechirko purposefully incited a crowd of peaceful demonstrators. “We don’t have any information that makes this seem like this was an intentional act,” Minnesota Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington told CNN. “He saw the crowd, and from what it looked like, panicked.” According to jail records, Vechirko remains in police custody without bail. US military helicopter buzzes downtown DC protesters Published 2 a.m. EDT June 2: A U.S. Army Black Hawk helicopter flew just above rooftops in a downtown Washington D.C. neighborhood Monday night, employing a military tactic typically reserved for combat zones, The Washington Post reported. The helicopter flew just above rooftop level, snapping branches off trees and shattering some storefront window, the Post reported, noting the low-flying maneuver is normally performed to scare off insurgents.
  • Tropical depression 3 formed over the southwestern Gulf of Mexico Monday.  The latest advisory from the National Hurricane Center says it is getting better organized over the Bay of Campeche as it slowly drifts to the West.  By Sunday the storm is expected to have 65 mile per hour winds and by then should have earned the name Crystobal, but, it is not expected to move very far, very fast.  However, the forecast for Central Florida calls for increased rain chances toward the end of the work week.
  • VIDEO: US military helicopters hover low over DC protests to disperse crowd Protesters in Washington DC were subjected to low flying military aircraft in an effort to get the crowds to disperse.  APP USERS CAN SEE VIDEO HERE. APP USERS CAN SEE VIDEO HERE.  APP USERS CAN SEE VIDEO HERE. 
  • Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd had a stern message for who he called professional protesters - not Polk residents wanting to exercise their first amendment rights: “don’t create havoc in Polk County!” During a press conference Monday he extended the county curfew from 8:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. after a weekend of unrest and promised to lock anyone up who came to his county “to riot, to loot, to injure people.” Judd also addressed rumors that some protesters would try to take their criminal conduct into the neighborhoods; “if you value your life, they probably shouldn’t do that in Polk County, “ he said. “Because the people of Polk County like guns, they have guns, I encourage them to own guns, and they’re going to be in their homes tonight with their guns loaded and if you try to break into their homes to steal, to set fires, I’m highly recommending they blow you back out of the house with their guns. So, leave the community alone.” Judd said. The sheriff urged peaceful protests and said residents should keep the focus on George Floyd adding that if anything like that happened in Polk County,  the people involved “ would have been locked up in the county jail by sundown.” Watch the entire press conference below, the sheriff states his call to arms at about the 11 minute mark.  App users click here to see the video. 
  • Two Atlanta police officers have been fired for using a stun gun on two college students during this weekend’s protests in Atlanta. A video of officers Mark Gardner and Ivory Streeter using the stun gun on the students as they sat in a vehicle led to action by Atlanta’s mayor and police chief. The Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard said he’s investigating and looking at criminal charges against the officers. Still shaken, the Morehouse and Spelman students spoke for the first time Monday about what happened Saturday night. “We felt like we were going to die in that car,” said Taniyah Pilgrim, a student at Spelman College. The Atlanta Police Department provided WSB-TV with body camera video from seven different officers showing Messiah Young, a senior from Morehouse College, and Pilgrim, his girlfriend, tased and dragged from their car. “I’m sorry you guys had to even see something like that occur. It’s disgusting,” Pilgrim said Monday. Moments before they were tased, the video shows Young taking a video of the police and protesters from his car. The couple said they were not part of the protests, but were going out to eat and got stuck in the traffic. “At the end of the day, it’s a blessing that I’m alive and here to talk with you,” Young said. Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and police Chief Ericka Shields said the videos left them no choice but to terminate officers Streeter and Gardner. “I knew that I had only one option, and that was to terminate the employees,” Shields said. WSB-TV dug into the history of the two men. Both were longtime veterans of the force and investigators in APD’s fugitive unit. Both men, according to state peace officer records, had just gone through use-of-force and de-escalation training in the last two months. Streeter completed his de-escalation training just last week. Vince Champion, Southeast regional director for the International Brotherhood of Police Officers, told WSB-TV that he thinks the officers should have been placed on leave while they were investigated. “We just don’t know the facts. Making an arrest on video as a police officer, almost all of them are going to be ugly,” Champion said. Young has a fractured arm and 20 stitches from the incident. He also spent the night in jail. The couple and their attorneys want more disciplinary action taken against the officers involved. “This is a long, long fight. This isn’t just about me. This is an entire generation that has to deal with brutality and injustice and wrongdoing for nothing because of the color of their skin,” Young said. WSB-TV remained in contact with Howard’s office throughout Monday. Howard was said to be speaking with the families, the police chief, and then will make a determination on any possible criminal charges against the officers.

Washington Insider

  • With the sound of tear gas and flash bang explosions in the background, President Donald Trump on Monday evening said he would use 'all available federal civilian and military resources' to stop riots which have hit a number of cities around the nation in recent days, but offered no plan to address the issue of police brutality which spurred the unrest. 'I am your President of law and order,' President Trump declared in the White House Rose Garden, echoing a theme associated with the 1968 campaign of Richard Nixon, during a time of year marked by assassinations and bloody street protests, including riots in the nation's capital. 'I am dispatching thousands and thousands of heavily armed soldiers,' the President said, describing his efforts to clear the streets of protesters who have caused damage on the streets around the White House. The President then marched over to a nearby church across Lafayette Park, which had been damaged by demonstrators. The President's declaration came as hundreds of National Guard troops were driven into the White House complex during the afternoon, as police moved to enforce a new 7 pm curfew in the city. Even before the curfew began, security forces used pepper balls, tear gas, and flash bang grenades to move protestors even further away from the White House. Democrats denounced the President's declaration. “The fascist speech Donald Trump just delivered verged on a declaration of war against American citizens,” said Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR). “These are not the words of a President,” said Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA).  “They are the words of a dictator.” “Unleashing state violence on American protesters to create political theater for a photo op isn’t law and order, it’s a betrayal of everything our country stands for,” said Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA). 'The military should not be used against the American people,' said Rep. Ruben Gallego (D-AZ).