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  • The iconic dive bar Wally's Liquors on North Mills Avenue in Orlando could be making a comeback before the end of the year, according to the owner. Linda Updike, widow of namesake owner Wally Updike says the Orlando bar has been sold to a new group whose name has not yet been released.  The business, which has been in downtown since 1954 has been known for its colorful crowd and interior decorating, as well as its unbeatable princes on booze and long hours of operation. Folks say people like lawyer John Morgan would shout 'For the People', and then buy a round of beers for everyone as he talks with his fellow patrons.  Wally's closed back in August after the owner’s business partner and operator Martin Snellgrove became ill and then died a month later.  Linda says the old staff would be hired back under the new owners and that not much would change except for the sign which reads 'Same Family Since 1954.'  In addition, some renovations to the building will be needed, including structural repairs which she describes as years of 'Band-Aid surgery' to places like the roof and the electrical systems.
  • With sharp debate between the two parties over how best to deal with health insurance coverage for those with pre-existing medical conditions, the Trump Administration unveiled new rules on Monday which would make it easier for states to apply for waivers from the Obama health law, allowing companies to offer insurance which is less expensive, but also which has less coverage for consumers. “States know much better than the federal government how their markets work,” said Seema Verma, the head of the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Releasing new rules for plans to give states more flexibility on what type of health insurance polices can be sold, the feds made clear that the goal of the Trump Administration is simple – to move ‘insurance markets away from the one-size-fits-all rules and regulations’ of the Obama health law. In other words – Republicans say it’s another effort to try to get around some of the rules and insurance limits under Obamacare. . @CMSGov has released NEW guidance for State Relief and Empowerment Waivers! This guidance gives states tools to choices + premiums! https://t.co/xjKkpM4ZjZ #StateInnovation pic.twitter.com/RXCDUFP40H — Administrator Seema Verma (@SeemaCMS) October 22, 2018 Critics of both the Trump Administration and the GOP Congress denounced the new rules, arguing it will result in consumers buying insurance plans that don’t cover everything, and opening up coverage questions for those with pre-existing conditions. “This is major. The impact really cannot be overstated,” said Topher Spiro, a frequent critic of the Trump Administration’s efforts to repeal the Obama health law. “States that do this will bifurcate the market, segregating healthy people from sick people.” “This new guidance from the Trump administration on state waivers continues a theme of trying instead to make end-runs around the ACA’s rules,” said Larry Levitt of the Kaiser Family Foundation. “This will likely widen the gap between red states and blue states for access, affordability, regulation, and protections for pre-existing conditions,” Levitt added. The ACA created state-based insurance markets with minimum federal rules on benefits and pricing. New 1332 guidance allows much greater state-to-state variation in the availability and affordability of insurance products. — Caroline Pearson (@CF_Pearson) October 22, 2018 What’s at work here is that the Trump Administration is using the immense rule-making powers granted to the feds under the Obama health law – the Affordable Care Act – in order to shape the law more to the liking of Republicans and the White House. The new rules were issued as Democrats have been attacking Republicans over the issue of coverage of pre-existing conditions, arguing that GOP plans – like those issued on Monday – would have the effect of putting people in insurance coverage which does not coverage all pre-existing medical problems. “President Trump is desperate to change the subject from health care to immigration because he knows that health care is the number one issue Americans care about,” said House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi. “Republicans in Congress are putting health care coverage for the elderly and Americans with pre-existing conditions on the chopping block,” said Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR). Republicans look at it much differently – they say these efforts are the natural backlash to a system set up by the Obama health law which forces a system upon many Americans that doesn’t work for them.
  • Orange County sheriff’s deputies are investigating a deadly shooting inside a bar with a history of recent issues. Deputies were called to the Happy Place bar near Orange Blossom Trail and Southland Boulevard around 5:40 a.m. Monday.  Adrian Peralta, 24, was pronounced dead the scene, Channel 9’s Jeff Deal learned.  Deputies have not yet said what led to the shooting.  'Our detectives are here on scene. They will be reviewing any surveillance videos and they are interviewing witnesses that were on scene,' said Orange County sheriff's office spokesperson Ingrid Tejada-Monforte.  This is the third shooting at the bar since the beginning of July. On July 9, a man was shot to death and four others were injured, including a security guard, outside the bar.  A 55-year-old innocent bystander was shot outside the bar on Sept. 10 after a confrontation between a security guard and another person in the parking lot.
  • The man suspected of fatally shooting a police officer Saturday in Georgia was killed Monday in a confrontation with police, authorities said. Police believe Tafahree Maynard, 18, killed Officer Antwan Toney as the officer was checking out a suspicious vehicle near a metro Atlanta middle school on Saturday. >> Read more trending news  Here are the latest updates: Update 12:50 p.m. EDT Oct. 22: The man accused of killing a Gwinnett police officer was found hiding in a wooden shed wielding a lawn mower blade and was shot and killed after he refused to obey police commands, authorities said. After receiving information from a tipster on Tafahree Maynard whereabouts, 75-90 police officers descended on a neighborhood in unincorporated Snellville, set up a perimeter and went house to house, Gwinnett Police Chief Butch Ayers said at a press briefing. After finding Maynard, police initially used a Taser. They shot after determining he had the mower blade. “The danger to the community is over,” Ayers said. Update 11:35 a.m. EDT Oct. 22: Officials told WSBTV on Monday that Maynard, the man accused of shooting and killing a Gwinnett County police officer Saturday, is dead. Sources had earlier told the news station that Maynard was located Monday in Gwinnett County. Update 11:20 a.m. EDT Oct. 22: Sources told WSBTV’s Gwinnett Bureau Chief Tony Thomas that Maynard was located Monday morning. Police earlier said Maynard, who is suspected of firing the shots that killed Toney, 'should be considered armed and dangerous.'  Update 9:45 a.m. EDT Oct. 22: Gwinnett County police said Monday that there had been a 'credible sighting' within the last 12 hours of Tafahree Maynard, the 18-year-old suspected of shooting and killing Officer Antwan Toney on Saturday. Police previously warned that Maynard 'should be considered armed and dangerous.' Update 8:45 p.m. EDT Oct. 21: Gwinnett County authorities have taken three people into custody in connection with the fatal shooting of Officer Antwan Toney Saturday in Snellville. Investigators said the three are not under arrest, but were taken into custody during a search of a home Sunday near the scene of the shooting. The main suspect, Tafahree Maynard, 18, is still on the loose and considered armed and dangerous. “It’s very important just for the safety of the area, for the peace of mind of the public and the officers here at the department, we would like to take him into custody,” a police spokesman said. “We’d encourage him to turn himself in. We can guarantee his safety, if he just turns himself in.” There’s a $5,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of Maynard. Update 9:34 a.m. EDT Oct. 21: A new mugshot was released of Isaiah Pretlow, now in custody in the shooting death of a Gwinnett County police officer. Tafahree Maynard, believed by police to have fired the shot that killed Officer Antwan Toney, remains at large. Update 6:17 a.m. EDT Oct. 21: Gwinnett County police announced early Sunday that one suspect is in custody in the shooting death of a Gwinnett County police officer Saturday. Another suspect is still on the run.  Isaiah Pretlow is in custody and charged with aggravated assault in connection with the shooting death of Officer Antwan Toney. He's accused of pointing a gun at an officer during the manhunt.  Tafahree Maynard, who police believe fired the shot that killed Toney, is still on the run, authorities said. Police are encouraging Maynard to turn himself in. Although police originally said they thought up to four suspects were involved, they said Sunday morning that Pretlow and Maynard are the only suspects.  Late Saturday, WSB-TV's Rikki Klaus was on Cordite Loop, where police waited for a warrant to search the home. It's unclear if Pretlow was arrested at the home.  Toney, 30, was shot while responding to a suspicious vehicle parked near Shiloh Middle School in unincorporated Snellville on Saturday afternoon, police said. The car was parking at Crumps Landing Road and White Road. Gwinnett County Sgt. Jake Smith said in a news conference that someone reported the vehicle and that the people inside may have been smoking marijuana.  Toney and another officer approached the vehicle, and that's when someone started shooting from inside the car, authorities said. 'Before they could even get to the vehicle, shots rang out,' Smith said.  Police returned fire as an officer dragged Toney away. Toney was rushed to Gwinnett Medical Center in critical condition where he died, officials said. The two-year veteran was just days from celebrating his third anniversary with the department on Oct. 26.  Smith said that '99.999 percent' of the time, routine calls don't end up in gunfire. “That it went this way, it’s just tragic,” Smith said. The suspects sped away and crashed the vehicle on Ross Road and Calumet Farm Lane less than a mile from the shooting scene, got out of the car and ran, authorities said. Police originally said witnesses reported seeing up to four people run away. On Saturday night, the car was towed to police headquarters.  Gwinnett County police have opened a new 24-hour tipline and are asking for the public's help to learn more about the shooting. They are asking anyone with information to call 770-513-5710. It's the first time an officer has been killed in Gwinnett County since 1993. Original report: A police officer in Gwinnett County, Georgia, checking out a suspicious vehicle near a Snellville-area middle school was shot and killed Saturday as the car sped away. Four suspects were on the run Saturday night. The officer, Antwan Toney, died after he was taken to Gwinnett Medical Center, according to the police department. He had been on the Gwinnett police force for three years. Toney and other officers were responding to a report of a suspicious vehicle parked near Shiloh Middle School on Saturday afternoon, police said. When officers approached, the suspects fired through their vehicle’s window, hitting Toney before driving off, said police spokesman Jake Smith. The officers returned fire, but it’s unknown whether the suspects were hit or injured. The suspects crashed their vehicle a short time later, and as many as four people ran from the scene.  Law enforcement officers, helicopters, SWAT teams and K-9 units swarmed the area to search for the suspects, checking nearby buildings and wooded areas. DeKalb County police were called in to help. A witness described one of the suspects to police as a 6-foot-tall man with long dreadlocks, green sweatpants and a gray T-shirt. Descriptions of the other suspects weren’t available. Toney was a member of the Gwinnett Police Department’s Uniform Division, and he was working his shift on patrol Saturday. Toney is the first Gwinnett officer killed in the line of duty in years. In 1993, Officer Chris Magill was killed by a drunk driver while engaged in a traffic stop with another drunk driver. Three Gwinnett officers were gunned down in 1964 when they were investigating a “suspicious activity” call near Norcross. The officers — Jerry Everett, Marvin Gravitt and Ralph Davis — were handcuffed together and shot with their own weapons. Saturday’s shooting came after three separate officer-involved shootings in Georgia on Thursday that left two men dead. In one of the previous shootings, a state patrolman was shot at close range along I-75 south in Bartow County but survived because he was wearing a body armor vest. Two troopers returned fire and killed the original shooter, according to the Georgia State Patrol. The other shooting death occurred in Monroe when a man carrying a replica Thompson submachine gun allegedly pointed it at an officer, according to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation. In the third incident, a suspect shot at police in Richland. but no one died.
  • Rae Carruth is a free man. The former Carolina Panther was released from prison Monday morning after serving nearly 19 years for orchestrating the murder of his pregnant girlfriend. >> Read more trending news Carruth was released at 8:01 a.m. from the Sampson Correctional Facility in Clinton, North Carolina. The 1997 first-round draft pick was released after completing his sentence of 18 to 24 years. Carruth did not speak to reporters as he left the prison wearing a knit cap and an unzipped jacket on a chilly morning with temperatures in the high 30s. There was a smattering of applause as Carruth got into a white SUV before he was whisked away from the prison. A source close to Carruth told WSOCTV that he was picked up from prison by a family member. When he left prison, Carruth was given a copy of his release papers, his Social Security card, his birth certificate, information on community resources and a pharmacy discount card. He also got certificates for programs he completed while he was locked up, including a registered examiners’ card from the North Carolina Board of Barbers and a barber's certificate from Central Carolina Community College. Carruth, now 44, was found guilty of orchestrating a plot to kill Cherica Adams on Nov. 16, 1999, in Charlotte, to avoid paying child support. Adams was shot four times while driving her car, but managed to make a 911 call that helped implicate Carruth. >> On WSOCTV.com: LIFE AFTER DEATH: Rae Carruth and The Son Who Survived, the investigation and the crime Adams fell into a coma and died less than a month later after the shooting. The child she was carrying, Chancellor Lee Adams, was delivered by emergency cesarean section but he suffers from permanent brain damage and cerebral palsy. >> On WSOCTV.com: LIFE AFTER DEATH: Rae Carruth and The Son Who Survived, Chancellor Lee Adams Despite his high-profile case, officials said Carruth would not be given any special privileges and will be treated like any other released inmate. Last week, Carruth told WSOCTV anchor Erica Bryant in a telephone interview, 'I just truly want to be forgiven.' Carruth went on to say he was 'somewhat frightened' about his release, adding that 'I'm nervous just about how I'll be received by the public. I still have to work. I still have to live. I have to exist out there and it just seems like there is so much hate and negativity toward me.' Carruth has repeatedly said he wants to have a relationship with his son, who remains in the custody of his grandmother, Saundra Adams, who has raised him since birth. Adams had previously said she would be there when Carruth got out of prison, but she was not present on Monday. >> On WSOCTV.com: LIFE AFTER DEATH: Rae Carruth and the Son Who Survived, the trial  Carruth's arrest on charges of conspiracy and attempted murder nine days after the shooting sent shockwaves through the Panthers organization. The team released Carruth and the NFL suspended him indefinitely after he posted $3 million bail and fled the Charlotte area. He was found by federal authorities hiding in the trunk of a car in Tennessee, about 500 miles from Charlotte. >> On WSOCTV.com: LIFE AFTER DEATH: Rae Carruth and The Son Who Survived, the next chapter Panthers center Frank Garcia, who was teammates with Carruth for more than two seasons, said players were stunned when they heard news of Carruth's possible involvement in the murder, about 20 miles from the team's downtown stadium in the affluent section of South Charlotte. 'It would be like finding out the guy sitting in the cubicle next to you at work was arrested for murder,' Garcia said. 'You just don't always know people as well as you think you do.' Garcia said Carruth was a little shy and that he kept mostly to himself. But he said Carruth had a passion for helping kids, including reading books to elementary school students. It was a difficult time in Panthers history. Some players were called out of football practice to testify at the trial. Those not involved would spend time huddling in the players' lounge watching the trial on Court TV. 'That is one time where you were actually hiding from the cameras,' Garcia said. 'You just wanted to stay low and not be involved. All along you're asking yourself, 'Did I miss any signs? How is somebody capable of this?'' While in jail, Carruth worked as a barber, making about $1 per hour, according to North Carolina Department of Public Safety spokesman Jerry Higgins. That's a far cry from the four-year, $3.7 million contract Carruth signed with the Panthers after being drafted -- although he never collected all of that money since he was released in the third year of his deal. Carruth's future remains uncertain.