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  • A watchdog group said Monday that emails released to the organization show that President Donald Trump’s daughter and senior White House adviser Ivanka Trump used a personal email address to conduct White House business as recently as March, although a White House spokesperson said that the first daughter did not have a government email account when the correspondence was sent. >> Read more trending news The discovery by watchdog group American Oversight came one day after Ivanka Trump’s husband, Jared Kushner, said through a statement by his attorney that he used a private email address to conduct government business. >> Related: Jared Kushner used personal email to conduct White House business, lawyer says The emails from Ivanka Trump to Linda McMahon, administrator of the United States Small Business Administration, were sent in February, according to copies of the correspondence released by American Oversight. At the time, Ivanka Trump was not a federal employee but was “operating inside the White House in a nonofficial capacity,” Newsweek reported. In a statement obtained by Newsweek, a White House spokesperson said that Ivanka Trump became a federal employee in March. “She made clear that one of her reasons for doing so was to ensure that she would have access to government-issued communications devices and receive an official email account to protect government records,” the spokesperson said, adding that at the time of the communications, Ivanka Trump did not have an official email account. Austin Evers, executive director of American Oversight, however, said that the situation shows “yet again … that there’s one rule for the Trump family and another for everyone else.” “It’s simply breathtaking that both Ivanka and Jared Kushner would conduct government (business) on a personal email account after running a campaign centered on that very issue,” Evers said. “The fact that they would brazenly ignore rules governing email use raises even more questions about their judgment and fitness to hold positions in the White House.” The Hill reported that the emails from Ivanka Trump showed that she copied her chief of staff, Julie Radford, on the emails, and that Radford had a White House email address. Donald Trump criticized former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton sharply last year for her use of private email, leading supporters on chants of “Lock her up” and insisting that her actions were illegal as the two vied for a seat in the Oval Office. The FBI determined last year that Clinton did not break the law, although then-FBI Director James Comey said that she and her colleagues were 'extremely careless in their handling of very sensitive, highly classified information.”
  • As GOP Senators struggled to find enough support for the latest Republican plan to overhaul the Obama health law, dozens of demonstrators were arrested Monday after disrupting a U.S. Senate hearing on the Graham-Cassidy proposal, as the clock ticked to a September 30 deadline for action under special expedited budget procedures in Congress. “I’m here because Obamacare is a disaster in my state,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), who for now is still a few votes short on his plan to change the way the Obama health law works, by sending money directly to the states, allowing them to best figure out how to cover those who need health coverage. “No cuts to Medicaid; save our liberty,” chanted protesters at the Senate Finance Committee, some of whom were in wheelchairs, as they were taken outside for processing by police. Outside Dirksen, they have a long line of people being arrested and processed. pic.twitter.com/lDSZqJIHYE — Matt Fuller (@MEPFuller) September 25, 2017 At the hearing – the only one scheduled on the Graham-Cassidy bill, which was still being changed on Monday morning – Democrats again zeroed in on how the GOP health bill would impact those Americans with pre-existing medical conditions. “It doesn’t protect them,” testified Dick Woodruff, a top official with the American Cancer Society. “It basically makes the patient protections that were enacted into law with the Affordable Care Act discretionary on the part of each state,” Woodruff added, contradicting the explanation from Republican supporters. Democrats complained that Republicans were trying to jam a bill through Congress that had not been fully vetted – and was still being tweaked. “We got a third version last night at 7:30,” said Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR), “and we got a fourth version last night at 7:50, and then we got a fifth version at 9:23 in the morning.” Important part of tense Wyden-Cassidy exchange: Wyden asked if insurers can raise rates when someone gets sick. Cassidy wouldn't answer. — Chad Bolt (@chadderr) September 25, 2017 But as the Senate convened on Monday, it still wasn’t clear when the Senate might vote on the plan this week, as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell publicly thanked GOP lawmakers who have worked on health care. “If Obamacare’s failure has shown us anything, it’s that we need new ideas and a better approach,” McConnell said. But the Senate GOP leader was silent – for now – on when a vote on a GOP plan might take place.
  • The Pittsburgh Steelers didn’t take to the field Sunday as the national anthem played before the team faced the Chicago Bears, and that decision isn’t sitting well with some fans. >> Read more trending news Steelers fans across America posted videos on social media showing them burning their memorabilia after the team failed to show up for the anthem. The protest comes amid tension between NFL players, who first started taking a knee during the anthem last year in protest of inequality and police violence, and President Donald Trump, who called the protests disrespectful. >> Related: Trump slams NFL players for national anthem protests, athletes react Jim Heaney, a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps, posted on YouTube and said, “Can't come out and stand for our anthem or flag? I'm done with you. #BoycottPittsburghSteelers #BoycottTheNFL.”
  • Jared Kushner, President Donald Trump’s son-in-law and a senior White House adviser, used a personal email account to discuss official government business, despite his father-in-law’s criticism of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for doing the same, according to multiple reports. >> Read more trending news The email account was set up in December, Politico reported, noting that Kushner also uses an official White House email account. The news site was the first to report on Kushner’s use of private email. “Fewer than 100 emails from January through August were either sent to or returned by Mr. Kushner to colleagues in the White House from his personal email account,” Kushner’s lawyer, Abbe Lowell, said Sunday in a statement to Politico. “These usually forwarded news articles or political commentary and most often occurred when someone initiated the exchange by sending an email to his personal rather than his White House address.” Trump, who faced Clinton last year in the race for the White House, criticized the former secretary of state numerous times for her use of private email, leading supporters on chants of “Lock her up” and insisting that her actions were illegal. The FBI determined last year that Clinton did not break the law, although then-FBI Director James Comey said that Clinton and her colleagues were 'extremely careless in their handling of very sensitive, highly classified information.” Politico reported that there were no indications that Kushner used his private email account to discuss sensitive or classified information. An unidentified government official told The New York Times that “unlike in the Clinton case, Mr. Kushner had not set up a private server to house the personal email account. While Mrs. Clinton used her personal account exclusively, the official said that Mr. Kushner does use his government account.” At a news briefing on Monday, White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said that, to her knowledge, Kushner’s use of private email was “very limited.” “White House counsel has instructed all White House staff to use their government email for government matters,” she said, adding that staff was “instructed on this one pretty regularly.” Government officials are required to keep records of their correspondence under federal law. Lowell told the Times that all White House-related emails were forwarded to Kusner’s official government address in order to create a record of the correspondence.
  • A man fell from a French Quarter balcony Friday night as he leaned over the railing to spit on people walking below, New Orleans police officials said.  A police spokesman told NOLA.com that the man fell from the balcony of a bar in the 700 block of Bourbon Street. His condition was not immediately available.  >> Read more trending news The news site reported that about a dozen NOPD officers and Louisiana state troopers were on the scene, attempting to keep the crowd under control as an ambulance arrived to pick the injured man up.  Officers on horseback guarded the ambulance and cleared a path for it to leave the scene.