ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-night
79°
Sct Thunderstorms
H 91° L 76°
  • clear-night
    79°
    Current Conditions
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 91° L 76°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    91°
    Afternoon
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 91° L 76°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    83°
    Evening
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 91° L 76°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest newscast

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Orlando, FL Entertainment

Upcoming Events See All

See More

The Latest Headlines You Need To Know

  • A 17-year-old Texas girl who stepped up during a family emergency has earned praise from social media users across the globe after a tender photo of her with her baby brother went viral.  Candice Curry, of San Antonio, told ABC News that a family emergency kept her and her husband from being able to pick up 3-year-old James from his school on May 25. They called their teen daughter, Stiles Parish, and asked her to step in for them.  Curry said it was the first time they’d asked Stiles to pick up one of her younger siblings.  “I figured she had gone to get him, and (had) taken him home,” Curry told ABC News. “Later that day, I saw the picture on her Instagram and realized that she had taken him back to school.” >> Read more trending news Stiles, who is studying to become a nurse, took James back to class with her. In the Instagram photo, which bore the caption, “Take your kid to school,” James is sleeping peacefully in his big sister’s arms as she listens to the day’s lesson.  “She told me that she didn’t want to be counted absent, and that she didn’t want to miss any work,” Curry said of her daughter. “She not only helped our family out, but returned to her responsibility at school.” The teacher was unfazed by Stiles’ small guest, Curry said.  The mom, who said the photo “made (her) heart want to explode,” soon shared the image on her own Facebook page, where it received thousands of reactions and was shared across the social media platform.  “I'm not sure on the legalities here or what kind of rules were broken but I also just don't care,” Curry wrote in the Facebook post. “My sweet teenager helped her family out and returned to her other responsibility while snuggling her baby brother.  “I'm either the worst mom in the world or totally nailing it. Please don't tell me which one. Let me live in ignorant bliss while I stare at this picture.  “Life is short. These are the moments that make it so incredibly sweet.” Curry told ABC News that the photo showed her that despite the 14-year age difference between the two siblings, they still have a close bond.  “The fact that he is sleeping so comfortably on her in the middle of a class full of teenagers tells me how much he trusts her,” Curry said. “As a mom, it makes me so thankful that they have this kind of relationship, and I pray it will always stay that way.”
  • The line wraps around orange cones and security guards at Disney Springs.  News 96 five wdbo’s Samantha Jordan is walking the line talking to people hoping to wow the judges enough to make the cut and the reality TV show.  One contestant is just 17.  He says he’s always wanted to sing to make people happy.  She also spoke with singer Summer Moon who is standing in line with her Ukulele hoping to get a shot at the show.  Another young woman near the front of the line tells Jordan she just needs the courage and strength for the audition and she knows she can do it. 
  • A look at monuments that have been removed, covered up or vandalized in recent days: ___ NEW YORK Plaques honoring Gen. Robert E. Lee were removed from the property of a now-closed Episcopal church in Brooklyn on Wednesday. Gov. Andrew Cuomo also called on the Army to rename two streets at nearby Fort Hamilton that honored Lee and Gen. Thomas 'Stonewall' Jackson. The plaques, including one more than a century old, were taken down at St. John's Episcopal Church because they were 'offensive to the community,' said Bishop Lawrence Provenzano of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island. ___ BALTIMORE Four Confederacy-related monuments were hauled away on trucks under cover of darkness late Tuesday night and early Wednesday. Mayor Catherine Pugh said she was concerned that such statues might spark violence. One monument honored Maryland resident Roger B. Taney, the U.S. Supreme Court justice who wrote the Dred Scott decision denying citizenship to African-Americans. ___ DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA A bronze statue of a Confederate soldier was pulled from its pedestal by protesters Monday night. The 1924 monument stood in front of a government office building until demonstrators used a rope to pull it down. Four people have been arrested, and authorities plan more arrests. Gov. Roy Cooper has called for the removal of all Confederate monuments on public property around the state. ___ WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA In another North Carolina town, two Confederate statues were vandalized with spray paint. Someone also tied a rope around one of the statues in what may have been an attempt to topple it, police said Wednesday. No arrests were immediately made. ___ KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE A 1914 monument honoring fallen Confederate soldiers was splattered with paint. Opponents are signing a petition to have it removed from a neighborhood near the University of Tennessee campus. ___ BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA A 52-foot-tall obelisk honoring Confederate soldiers and sailors was covered by wooden panels at the mayor's order. The 1905 monument is in a downtown park. The cover-up Tuesday prompted a lawsuit by Alabama's attorney general, who argues that it violates a new law prohibiting the removal of historical structures, including rebel memorials. ___ LOS ANGELES Hollywood Forever Cemetery, where many movie legends are interred, removed a 6-foot Confederate monument that was erected in 1925. The stone and attached plaque were trucked away to storage Wednesday after the cemetery received hundreds of calls and emails requesting its removal. More than 30 Confederate veterans and their families are buried in the cemetery. Their grave markers will remain. ___ SAN DIEGO The city removed a plaque naming Confederate President Jefferson Davis from a downtown plaza Wednesday. The plaque honored San Diego as the Western terminus of the Jefferson Davis Highway between Virginia and California. It was presented to the city in 1926 by a state chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. ___ TAMPA, FLORIDA A 106-year-old statue of Confederate soldiers will remain on public property unless opponents raise enough money to move it to a private cemetery, officials decided. The Hillsborough County Commission voted last month to remove the monument but voted Wednesday to do so only if private funds can be raised in 30 days.
  • President Donald Trump took to Twitter early Thursday to respond to the backlash over his comments on the deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, slamming Sen. Lindsey Graham and the media. >> Trump again blames ‘both sides’ for violence in Charlottesville 'Publicity seeking Lindsey Graham falsely stated that I said there is moral equivalency between the KKK, neo-Nazis & white supremacists ... and people like Ms. Heyer,' he wrote, referring to Heather Heyer, the 32-year-old woman killed Saturday while protesting the white supremacist Unite the Right rally. 'Such a disgusting lie. He just can't forget his election trouncing. The people of South Carolina will remember!' Trump added: 'The public is learning (even more so) how dishonest the Fake News is. They totally misrepresent what I say about hate, bigotry etc. Shame!' On Wednesday, Graham, R-S.C., issued the following statement: 'Mr. President, I encourage you to try to bring us together as a nation after this horrific event in Charlottesville. Your words are dividing Americans, not healing them,' Graham said, according to CNN. 'Through his statements yesterday, President Trump took a step backward by again suggesting there is moral equivalency between the white supremacist neo-Nazis and KKK members who attended the Charlottesville rally and people like Ms. Heyer.' >> Read more trending news In a news conference Tuesday, Trump blamed 'both sides' for the violence. “You had many people in that group other than neo-Nazis and white nationalists,' he said. 'The press has treated them absolutely unfairly.” He added: 'You also had some very fine people on both sides.
  • They’re calling it - “Two balls and a STRIKE!” A ceremonial first pitch Wednesday night may go down in history as possibly the worst ever.  The errant pitch hit a photographer, who happened to snap a photo of the ball moments before the strike.  (App users can see video here) (App users can see the image here)