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  • A Pennsylvania woman is facing charges after police said she overdosed while seven months pregnant. >> Read more trending news Kasey Dischman, 30, overdosed in her East Butler home on Friday, days after getting out of jail for retail theft, authorities said. In order to try to save her baby, doctors had to deliver the girl by performing an emergency cesarean section. Pennsylvania State Police said they are charging Dischman, who is recovering in a hospital, with aggravated assault on an unborn child. Dischman’s baby is in critical condition and on life support. If the baby does not survive, police told said they plan to charge Dischman with homicide.
  • The powerful drug fentanyl claimed the life of music legend Prince in 2016 and has, in recent years, largely contributed to the next wave of America’s opioid crisis. >> Read more trending news Here are 10 things you should know about fentanyl: What is fentanyl? Fentanyl, also known as Actiq, Duragesic or Sublimaze in its prescription form, is an especially potent painkiller developed in the 1960s used to treat extreme pain. According to the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, strains of fentanyl can be 50 times more powerful than morphine. >> Related: What is fentanyl and how does it kill? Some street names for the drug (or for non-pharmaceutical fentanyl-laced heroin) include Apache, China Girl, China White, Dance Fever, Friend, Goodfella, Jackpot, Murder 8, TNT and Tango and Cash, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Where is fentanyl manufactured? According to a recent U.S. government report, fentanyl in recent years has been traced back to illegal labs in China and Mexico, trafficked to countries (like the U.S.), laced with heroin and sold to buyers who have no knowledge of the drug’s presence. When do doctors prescribe fentanyl? Physicians prescribe fentanyl as a pain reliever or anesthesia, typically for opioid-tolerant patients undergoing heart surgery (as anesthesia), cancer patients already receiving maintenance opioid medication for pain or patients with chronic pain who need around-the-clock opioids. >> Related: DEA: N. Fulton woman detained; sold fentanyl to undercover agents The controlled substance can be legally prescribed via injection, patch, lozenges or lollipop. What are the side effects of fentanyl? From the National Institute on Drug Abuse: Drowsiness Confusion Constipation Weakness Dry mouth Constricted pupils Unconsciousness Slowed respirations Decreased heart rate Nausea Sweating Flushing Confusion Stiff or rigid muscles Tight feeling in the throat Difficulty concentrating How does fentanyl work? Fentanyl (and other opioids) binds to receptors in parts of the brain that control pain and emotions, increasing dopamine levels and creating a state of euphoria. What makes fentanyl so dangerous? Like any opiate, fentanyl use can increase the risk of dependency and lead to both abuse and addiction. When the drug isn’t properly ingested as prescribed or is consumed illicitly or accidentally, just one small dose can result in death. >> Related: Death toll rises in mass overdose in central Georgia Because fentanyl is so highly potent, drug dealers have increasingly been mixing heroin, oxycodone or Xanax with fentanyl, deceiving buyers who are unaware that a powder or pill contains the drug. But this deception, according to Harvard Medical School, is proving fatal. One strain of fentanyl (furanyl fentanyl) is so potent that you could die from just touching it, according to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation. The furanyl fentanyl, labeled and sold as oxycodone pills and powder, caused 19 deaths in Georgia from 2016 to 2017. Some of the opioid receptors in the brain that fentanyl binds to also help control breathing, but high doses of opioids such as fentanyl (usually consumed accidentally or illicitly) can stop someone from breathing altogether, killing them. Read more here.
  • Dale Earnhardt Jr. makes his final start at Daytona International Speedway on Saturday as a member of NASCAR’s Monster Energy Cup series. Not many have more success at the World Center of Racing. Earnhardt Jr. has won 17 times at the track, including twice winning the Coke Zero 400 and the Daytona 500. Only two racers have done better: Tony Stewart (19) and Dale Earnhardt, his father, who captured the checkered flag 34 times on the high banks of the two-and-a-half mile oval. The Speedway listed Jr.s most impressive and memorable victories there: July 7, 2001/ Coke Zero 400: In the first NASCAR race at Daytona International Speedway since the death of his father in a last-lap accident in the DAYTONA 500, Earnhardt raced to a storybook victory on a hot summer night. It was arguably the most popular victory in the history of NASCAR. The race was followed by a massive tri-oval grass celebration involving Earnhardt, teammate and runner-up Michael Waltrip and Dale Earnhardt Incorporated team members. Afterward, the winner summed the night up perfectly: “You couldn’t have written a better script.”   Feb. 15, 2004/DAYTONA 500: Winning the DAYTONA 500 for the first time, with President George W. Bush in attendance for a portion of the race, Earnhardt led 58 laps in the iconic No. 8 Budweiser Chevrolet and nipped runner-up Tony Stewart by a scant .273 seconds. In the post-race press conference there was a classic moment. A speedway official interrupted the question-and-answer period by handing Earnhardt his cell phone. The president was on the line. Earnhardt had a brief conversation with Bush and then ended the call as, at that moment, only he could: “Thank you very much, take it easy man.'  July 2, 2010/Coca-Cola Firecracker 250: Driving a No. 3 Richard Childress-owned and Wrangler-sponsored Chevrolet in honor of his late father, Earnhardt won a NASCAR XFINITY Series race for the first time since 2006. Earnhardt held off Joey Logano and Ricky Stenhouse Jr. in a “NASCAR Overtime” finish. “I worked hard to try to win, not only for Daddy but all these fans,” Earnhardt said. “It’s emotional.” Earnhardt also added that it was the last time he would drive a No. 3 car.  Feb. 23, 2014/DAYTONA 500: Earnhardt’s second DAYTONA 500 victory, this time in the No. 88 National Guard Chevrolet, gave car owner Rick Hendrick his eighth victory in “The Great American Race.” That major moment prompted another: Earnhardt tweeted for the first time at 2:30 a.m. the Monday morning after the race. His Twitter account had already been created, with nearly a quarter-million followers even though Earnhardt was absent. The milestone tweet: “Tonight seemed like as good a night as any to join Twitter. How is everyone doin? #2XDaytona500Champ.” His feed blew up. “I feel like I represent Junior Nation,” he said later that week. “I represent my fan base and the people that support our team.” A footnote: he now has more than two million Twitter followers.  July 7, 2015/Coke Zero 400: A second victory in the Coke Zero 400 came after rain postponed the start of the race until Sunday night, with the finish actually coming early Monday morning. Driving the No. 88 Nationwide Stars and Stripes Chevrolet, Earnhardt started on the pole, led 40 of the first 80 laps and ended with a race-high 96 laps led. His talent at restrictor-plate races had been complemented by an exceptional Chevy. 'I had a lot of fun tonight,' Earnhardt said. “We ran very fast. I had to block a lot, get a lot of pushes from everybody. I had to run real hard to win this race.” Tickets are still available for this weekend’s NASCAR race in Daytona Beach. 
  • Roswell police say they couldn’t charge an obviously impaired driver with DUI because officers had to use NARCAN to revive him. Michael Willis told WSBTV’s Mike Petchenik he was driving home from work on June 9 on Highway 92 near Mountain Park Road when he saw a car driving erratically. >>Narcan may be no match for 2 new fentanyl strains “I saw him start driving up on the sidewalk and he was driving on the wrong side of the road on a narrow, two-lane road,” Willis said. “He ran over a couple of road signs, mailboxes. I was really worried he was driving on the sidewalk.” >> Read more trending news  Willis said he and another driver called 911, then boxed in the man, who he said appeared to be laughing while his passenger appeared to be going in and out of consciousness. “My first thought was he was impaired or having some type of emergency that he probably shouldn’t be driving,” said Willis. “He was starting to speed up. He would come up behind me, so I’d speed up a little bit, then he slowed back down. I would slow down just to keep him from speeding through a residential area,” Willis said. Police told Petchenik the driver eventually pulled into the parking lot of Mountain Park Elementary when officers arrived. “It became pretty apparent the driver was under the influence of some type of narcotics where they had to administer NARCAN to the driver to revive him,” said department spokeswoman, Lisa Holland. Holland said both the driver and passenger appeared to be on some kind of drugs. “One couldn’t drive for the other. They were both under the influence and unable to drive a vehicle at that time which is scary to these citizens,” she said. Because of the NARCAN administered to the driver, Holland said police were unable to determine what drugs were in his system in order to charge him with DUI. “They go up to the hospital they are administered other drugs…counteracting measures are put into their system,” she said. Police did charge the unidentified driver with two counts of hit-and-run and he was issued a ticket. “I think it’s upsetting that they can’t be charged just because they were endangering a lot of people,” said Willis. “Had they hit that car head-on along Mountain Park Road it would have been really bad.”
  • A day after Republican leaders unexpectedly delayed action on a Senate health care bill, President Donald Trump pressed GOP Senators to get on board with the legislative effort, arguing that it’s time to on from the Obama health law. “Obamacare is dying, it’s essentially dead,” the President said in a photo op at the White House. “It’s been a headache for everybody, it’s been a nightmare for many,” the President added, as he made clear his desire for the GOP to reach an agreement that can get 50 votes in the Senate. Trump: It's 'very tough' to get the health care plan approved, but it would be 'far better than Obamacare' https://t.co/Q3WDqN4gCr — CNN Politics (@CNNPolitics) June 28, 2017 In his remarks, Mr. Trump sounded optimistic notes about getting Republicans to back a health care bill, saying several times that he had a good meeting on Tuesday with GOP Senators. “We’re working very hard, we’ve given ourselves a little more time to make it perfect,” the President said. But in the halls of Congress, there was no sense that the GOP was on the verge of a health care breakthrough, as Republicans staked out different points of view on what should change. In a letter to the President, Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) set out four different changes to the legislation, again expressing his opposition to a new regime of tax credits that would be used to help people pay for health insurance. Paul also frowned on a late change in the bill, which would say that if you go more than nine weeks without health insurance, then insurance companies could force you to wait 6 months before letting you buy an insurance plan. Sen Rand Paul R-KY wants 'continuous coverage' plan out – says it's a 'Republican version of the individual mandate' pic.twitter.com/18eeSsqRvz — Jamie Dupree (@jamiedupree) June 28, 2017 Paul said that appears to be nothing more than a “Republican version of the individual mandate,” the Obama Administration plan that forced people to buy health insurance, under the threat of a tax penalty if they did not. Republicans are expected to go home tomorrow. Congress is not in session next week. Lawmakers would return to Washigton the week of July 10.